May 1, 2018
Statins: A cholesterol cure-all?

Fewer than 40% of adults get the cholesterol meds they need

How does your facility approach statin administration?

People with high levels of bad cholesterol (LDL) and low levels of good cholesterol (HDL) are at an increased risk for other debilitating complications. Over the past decade, research has revealed the direct correlation between poor cholesterol management and cardiovascular disease, diabetes—even dementia. And while lifestyle changes are important, many LTC patients require prescription drugs to keep their levels in check.

 

 

Cholesterol Strategy, Senior Edition

Alongside a prescription statin or similar medication, long-term care patients may benefit from dietary and exercise changes. Caregivers should adhere to the following recommendations from the National Institutes of Health to keep cholesterol down and health up:

1. Try the TLC diet – As part of the greater Therapeutic Lifestyle Changes plan, this special dietary program entails daily caloric intake of less than 7% saturated fat, 25-35% of calories from fat, less than 200 mg of cholesterol, and no more than 2,400 mg of sodium.

2. Fit in physical fitness – Although some patients may be relatively inactive, caregivers can play to their abilities by offering a variety of daily activities. Some ideas include walks, temporary use of stairs as opposed to elevators, light gardening or cleaning, as well as group-led exercises.

3. Mind their medication – Depending on the person’s individual LDL and HDL levels, doctors will customize a unique prescription regimen. Today, high cholesterol can be treated via statins, bile acid sequestrants, fibrates, nicotinic acid, among other options. Talk to your SRX rep for availability.